September 12, 2014

Just like a “one-size-fits-all” business suit would never match the comfort, fit, and utility of one tailored for your body, a generic employee handbook is not as effective as one written specifically for your business. Instead, what you need is a custom handbook that will address all of the following:

  • Your state and city. In addition to the many federal laws that you must comply with, each state has hundreds of unique employment laws, and they are often more specific, stricter, and more broadly applicable. And depending on your city/municipality, even more specific rules may apply.
  • Your number of employees. Different laws and protections at both the state and federal levels kick in when you reach a certain number of employees. A company with 5 employees needs different policies and procedures than one with 15 employees, 25 employees, or 50+. For those practices who are growing quickly, you must also prepare for reaching the employee number milestones early. Retroactive application is not recommended.
  • Your industry. Healthcare is a very different industry from transportation, farming, or food service. Your employee handbook needs to take into account specifics and recent changes that apply to your field.
  • Your office culture. Just like a fingerprint, there is no other practice quite like yours in the world. You need something tailored to your business’ values and goals to get the greatest benefit from your employee handbook.

Combined, it’s clear that a one-size-fits-all solution can’t address all these areas properly for everyone. Something, somewhere, will be missed. And correctly merging your unique office culture with the policies and protections you need takes legal and HR expertise. That’s what CEDR is for—to make sure you get what you want, while still getting what you need.

Friendly Disclaimer: This information is general in nature and is not intended to provide legal advice or replace individual guidance about a specific issue with an attorney or HR expert. The information on this page is general human resources guidance that is believed to be current as of the date of publication. Note that CEDR is not a law firm, and as the law is always changing, you should consult with a qualified attorney or HR expert who is familiar with all of the facts of your situation before making a decision about any human resources or employment law matter.